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Design Classics

Design Classics

Design Classics #37: Arne Jacobsen’s Ant Chair

9th October 2012

Designed in 1952, the Ant Chair was first produced with three legs and was not an instant hit. It was only in 1980 that a fourth leg was added and a variety of finishes and colours were included in the range that it took off as a product. Its name came from the Danish Myren,…

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Design Classics

Design Classics #36: The Eames Eiffel Chair

2nd October 2012

Charles and Ray Eames were responsible for some of the most iconic designs of the 20th century; that lounge chair and ottoman, those ball coat hangers you see everywhere and the Eiffel chair as well as several children’s toys. The Eiffel was the first mass produced plastic chair. It was originally created in metal and…

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Design Classics

Design Classics #35: The Tulip Table

25th September 2012

Eero Saarinen, like many of the other Scandinavian greats, trained as an architect and created several stunning buildings, including St Louis Gateway Arch and the TWA terminal building in New York’s JFK airport. But it is for his furniture that he is chiefly remembered. The Tulip first appeared in 1957, when he decided to address…

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Design Classics

Design Classics #34: The Wishbone Chair by Hans Wegner

18th September 2012

Run your hands along the back of a Wishbone chair and you can instantly understand why Hans Wegner was known as the Master of the Chair. One of the most famous Danish designers (and let’s face it, there are a few to choose from), Wegner worked in a different way from all his contemporaries; when…

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Design Classics

Design Classics #33: The AGA

11th September 2012

Beloved by the middle classes,  owners of farmhouses and readers of a certain type of fiction, the AGA is a totemic symbol of country living. There is usually a wet dog lying in front of it, a pile of laundry steaming gently on it, and preferably the aroma of baking rising from within. The AGA…

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Design Classics

Design Classics #32: Sarpeneva Pot

4th September 2012

Scandinavian design is known chiefly for its ability to combine form and function without one losing out at the expense of the other. This Finnish casserole pot is a perfect example of that design sensibility. Designed in 1960 by Timo Sarpaneva, the wooden handle can be used either to carry the pot or to lift…

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Design Classics

Design Classics #31: Cornishware

24th July 2012

You might not know its name but you would certainly recognise its distinctive blue and white stripes. Perhaps from your grandparent’s kitchen, or some distant childhood memory. Cornishware, as it is correctly known, has been in production since the 1920s when Tom G Green bought a pottery and started making breakfast ware. Now, there are…

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Design Classics

Design Classics #30: Peugeot Peppermill

17th July 2012

It looks like a classic wooden peppermill. You’ve probably used one without realising. But it is, in fact, a Peugeot peppermill. Yes, it turns out that the French company has been making pepper, salt and coffee mills for longer than it has been making cars. Who knew? It is regarded by many as the best…

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Design Classics

Design Classics #29: Tupperware

10th July 2012

Its very name is synonymous with the product. Say “Tupperware” and everyone knows what you mean. They know about the parties, too. But do you know anyone who has actually been to one? Or who has any? You may not be aware, as you shop online and in those giant retail warehouses, that those parties…

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Design Classics

Design Classics #28: Kenwood Chef

3rd July 2012

 In 1948, Kenneth Wood gathered together £800 of capital and 20 members of staff and moved into a factory in Woking where he set up a manufacturing company. Two years later he launched the Kenwood Chef (A700 model) at the Ideal Homes Exhibition and began a new era of easy to use, labour saving devices…

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